Venous

Malformations

Venous malformations (VM) are a type of vascular malformation involving the “slow-flow” vessels, also known as veins.  These malformations are the most common type of vascular malformation and may appear anywhere on the body.  Most venous malformations are non-life threatening. These malformations are often incorrectly referred to as hemangiomas. Serial treatments are often required for treatment of these types of malformations. Initial treatment often requires an extensive study of the veins. Each additional treatment will have a more focused study of the veins correlated to the treatment area of the venous malformation.

Arteriovenous Malformations

Arteriovenous malformations (AVM) are abnormal connections of “high flow” vessels, also known as arteries and veins that can occur anywhere in the body.  These malformations do not go away on their own and commonly need treated to prevent risk of growth, bleeding, clotting and possibly high cardiac output congestive heart failure.  These types of lesions require arteriography, a mapping of the arteries under fluoroscopy, with every evaluation and treatment procedure. Serial treatments are often required for treatment of these types of malformations and may require an angiogram with each treatment.

Lymphatic

Malformations

Lymphatic malformations (LM) are a benign nest of lymphatic vessels that typically occur on the head and neck. However, they can present anywhere on the body. These malformations are spongy to touch and contain a clear/yellow lymph fluid.  These malformations usually show up by the 2nd year of life.  These lesions may increase and decrease in size and symptoms without treatment. They do not go away on their own and require intervention. These malformations are often incorrectly referred to as lymphangiomas. Serial treatments are often required for treatment of these types of malformations.

Capillary Venous Malformations

Capillary venous malformations (CVM) are a common malformation caused by enlarged blood vessels (capillaries) and may present as a birthmark or red/purple blotches of skin.  Capillary malformations can occur anywhere on the body. These malformations tend to grow as the person grows and may become more discolored over time. These lesions are benign and commonly referred to as port wine stains. These malformations are often incorrectly referred to as hemangiomas. Serial treatments are often required for treatment of these types of malformations. Initial treatment often requires an extensive study of the veins. Each additional treatment will have a more focused study of the veins correlated to the treatment area of the venous malformation.

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501 East Hampden Avenue - Suite 4600
Englewood, CO 80113
P: 303-788-4280  |  F: 303-788-4412
E: Info@YakesVascularMalformationCenter.com